What a difference a tooth makes!


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  • #27289
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    So during the first service, I got my dealer to fit the ‘Supersprox stealth’ rear sprocket (the one from the official Husky optional parts catalogue). I went for the 46 tooth version, one extra tooth above the standard 45 tooth sprocket.

    Upsides – I love the new look of it, nicer than the plain black all-steel stock sprocket, and apparently it’s lighter too. I wasn’t too bothered about the weight but a few of you chaps on here seem to obsess about weight reduction on the bikes, so I told myself it’s a good thing for my new lightweight sprocket 🙂

    Downsides – It’s expensive, but what Husky stuff isn’t? Also the stock chain isn’t long enough to accommodate the extra tooth. I found this hard to believe but there it is, I guess the factory managed to save a bit of money by fitting the shortest possible stock length chain. On other bikes I’ve been able to go up one tooth and retain the stock chain (Honda CB125F for instance). So that does make this modification a bit more expensive than I thought as I had to buy a new chain, but at least I was able to fit a good quality chain that should work well with the new sprocket.

    And my verdict after a few rides is that I’m amazed what a difference just the one extra tooth made. It has done exactly what I hoped, making the bike better for my busy city commute. 2nd gear is now great for filtering (lane splitting) without the engine bogging down, 3rd gear is really punchy for fast acceleration, and 4th gear is now a better city cruising gear, as I can ride at 30mph without the engine labouring, and also cruise at 40mph with some punchy acceleration still available in 4th if I need it.

    For the type of riding I do I can’t recommend this modification enough. It also makes 6th gear a bit more useful as it’s not so ‘tall’, and as I don’t do lots of motorway/highway riding at 70mph the higher engine rpms are not a big deal.

    #27552
    407guy407guy
    Participant

    Nice Vanessa!  Thanks for posting.

    #30027
    B.I.SavageB.I.Savage
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>For those interested, the stealths for the Svartpilen 401 are also available directly from SuperSprox in their online shop with a few options for customization.</p>

    #30046
    Max KoolMax Kool
    Participant

    One tooth?

    Stock is 16-40, you’re riding 16-46 now?

    #30054
    B.I.SavageB.I.Savage
    Participant

    401 is the same as a 390 ktm; 15 / 45 from the Factory

    #30055
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    @maxkool The stock rear sprocket on the Svartpilen 401 has 45 teeth. Husqvarna offer 44, 45 and 46 tooth “Stealth Supersprox” accessory options. So you have the option to “officially” go down one tooth, stay at 45, or go up one tooth.

    Maybe you are thinking of the 701 bike instead of the 401?

    #30056
    B.I.SavageB.I.Savage
    Participant

    Any one know whether even lower gearing setups are streetable, 14/46 or 15/47, and which ones would fit with a 114 chain?

    #30058
    Max KoolMax Kool
    Participant

    @vanessa stupid me, I thought we were talking about a 701. Sorry (I just should have looked better).

    #31433
    Avatar-373-Arrow
    Participant

    hey , how much does it affect it the miles from speedo readout? just wondering something by 3%? iam confused cause old bikes read out at front tire but new on shaft at front sproket so does rear sproket fake now the milage of the bike…any idea ? i just did same flip with an did vx chain with 118 links and the 15/46 set up it feels more stable and agile and direct power under 4.5-5k rpm

    #31436
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    It doesn’t affect the mileage readout or the speedometer reading. The front and rear wheels have wheel speed sensors which are read by the ABS system. The ABS ECU then sends signals to the speedometer for vehicle speed and distance travelled. Some early or basic ABS systems just send a ‘pulses per mile’ (or km) signal, which the speedometer itself uses to calculate vehicle speed and distance travelled. Modern ABS systems calculate an accurate ‘reference speed’ using an algorithm which uses inputs such as wheel speeds, acceleration rates, wheel + tyre inertia, throttle position, (and yaw pitch and roll if available from an IMU, sadly not fitted to the 401’s). The exact way the reference speed software works is proprietary and usually a closely guarded secret. The quality and accuracy of the reference speed calculation is the foundation upon which the ABS system is built.

    So swapping sprockets doesn’t affect this.

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