Making Evotech-Performance parts fit


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  • #12562
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    I’m a fan of Evotech-Performance parts (fitted them to my other bikes) so was disappointed that they don’t do parts for the Svartpilen 401. But they do some for the KTM Duke 390, so I ordered some to see if they would fit. I ordered the radiator guard, front fork crash bungs and rear paddock stand bobbins. None of these fitted straight out of the box, but with some modifications they will, so this thread will go through these. Firstly the radiator guard, the corners of this clashes with the 401 plastic radiator trim end caps. So using a strong pair of cutters (the guard is aluminium, so easily cuts) I cut square notches out of each corner. Roughly 2cm horizontally and 1cm vertically from each corner. Then clean up the edges with a small file and touch up with black paint. The guard clips over the bottom of the radiator, and secures using the two top OEM screw points. The original 401 screws are quite short, so when the guard is added under them with the included plastic clamping washers, there isn’t much thread left holding them in, so I replaced them with 5mm longer ones. I used M6 stainless flange-head hex drive screws, re-used the original lock washers followed by the Evotech plastic washer, then the guard, then attached to the bike. It works well and looks good. The plastic radiator end caps hide the cutouts in the guard corners. The next task will be the front fork crash bungs.

    • This topic was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by VanessaVanessa.
    #12570
    AvatarFreccia-nera
    Participant

    Thanks for the info. Could you show us some pictures of the final result ?

     

    Thanks in advance !

    #25787
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    OK, so hopefully here is a pic of the fitted Evotech radiator guard:

    #25788
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    Next I looked at fitting the front fork axle crash bungs. I realised that the Duke 390 ones would fit without any modification, see pic:

    You can also see the Roadlok in this pic.

     

    #25789
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    I’ll post about getting the rear paddock stand bobbins to fit another time, as it was quite involved and required me to make a new part on my lathe and mill.

    #27360
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    So, fitting the Evotech rear paddock stand bobbins to a standard Svartpilen 401 that hasn’t has it’s rear number plate bracket removed? It is possible, but requires the machining of an additional location adaptor.

    The Evotech rear paddock stand bobbins that are sold for the Duke 390 include cap-head fixing bolts that are M10 x 1.25mm fine pitch thread size. For some strange reason even though the swing arm for the 401 appears to be identical to that for the Duke 390, where this thread size is concerned, the Husqvarna swing arms have an M10 x 1.5mm coarse (standard) pitch thread. Quite why this difference exists I have no idea, but this is the first hurdle you’ll need to cross if you want to fit them. The bolts are 45mm long. So the first thing I did was to get hold of some stainless (I went for A4 marine grade stainless) replacement bolts with the standard coarse pitch M10 size.

    The right-hand rear bobbin is relatively easy to fit as it simply bolts straight onto the M10 threaded hole in the swingarm thus:

    But the left-hand one is more of a challenge. The corresponding M10 hole on the opposite side of the swingarm is used as one of the fixing points for the rear number plate bracket arm. It has a torx-head screw in it and has a fixing torque of 45Nm (might need to check to make sure on this). The arm is also held on by other fixings but these are all smaller (M8) and it’s the M10 fixing which is the strongest attachment fixing. It’s been a while since I did this mod, so I might not be 100% accurate here but I think the thread length of this M10 torx screw is 30mm. It can be removed without the rear arm falling off as it’s held on by the other fixings.

    So using my lathe and milling machine I made an adaptor from 303 stainless (chosen for it’s machinability). I started with a solid bar 18mm diameter, and ended up with this:

    It has a 30mm long M10 x 1.5 thread at one end, then 20mm of the 18mm dia bar, then has a hexagon (for tightening) machined onto the other end which is 15mm A/F which is 8mm long. At this end there is a hole drilled and tapped M10 x 1.5mm with 20mm thread length (so drill 25mm to achieve this) to accept the fixing bolt for the bobbin. Shown below assembled for info, but must be fitted to the bike separately with the adaptor first:

    To fit, first apply Loctite medium strength to the male adaptor thread and screw into the M10 hole in the swingarm. Use a 15mm socket and torque to 45Nm:

    This will secure the number plate arm to the swingarm. See the original TX45 Torx bolt (removed) on the floor. You now have a sturdy location point to attach the remaining paddock stand bobbin. I torqued this up to 20Nm:

    Now it’s possible to use a standard paddock stand with the U-shaped hooks as shown in the first pic.

    #27369
    VanessaVanessa
    Participant

    As a further refinement I decided to alter the bobbin stand-off lengths. I noticed that the right hand bobbin was much closer to the swing arm than the left hand bobbin so I made the following adjustment:
    The Evotech bobbins come with an aluminium spacer that fits inside each bobbin. These make the bobbins stand off from the swing arm. They are 15mm long and the attachment bolt passes through the bobbin, then the spacer, then into the swingarm. 9mm of the spacer sits inside the bobbin, with 6mm protruding as the stand-off length. I cut one spacer in two to make one 10mm long, and one 4mm long (1mm was lost to the saw blade width). On the left hand side bobbin I removed the 15mm spacer and fitted the 10mm one, making it sit closer to the adaptor I had made (and hence also the swing arm) giving a stand-off length of 1mm. I had to change the 45mm long stainless caphead bolt for a 40mm one. Then on the right hand side I took out the 15mm spacer and put the 4mm spacer inside the bobbin, then added the 15mm one, making the stand-off length on the LH side now 10mm. This time I had to change the 45mm fixing bolt for a 50mm long one.
    This has the effect of making the bike sit more central in the paddock stand, it’s not really necessary but then nothing I do to my bike is really. It just satisfies my OCD somewhat. Sorry for the complicated wordiness, that is unfortunately my style :-/

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