Long time/distance on the bike


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  • #5843
    AvatarDaniel Taylor
    Participant

    Hi, im new to the forum and thinking of getting one of these. found a lovely one with all he mods and only 200 miles on the clock.

    what are these like long distance?

    is it really uncomfortable to sit on and handlebars to low?

     

    how are you finding it now you have owned the bike for awhile?

     

    thank you for any feedback.

    #5853
    AvatarOld Rocker
    Participant

    Depends on what you mean by long distance.

    Unlike a “real” café racer the bars are quite high (part of the upper triple clamp), and the seat is fairly high in relation to the foot pegs so there is none of the “knees in the armpit” you get with an old Brit café racer as you stretch out over a long fuel tank. As long as you ride at a reasonable speed wind pressure takes a lot of your weight off the wrists.

    I have just returned from an 80 mile run non-stop on my Vit 401 with no aches or pains. I’m 69 years old……

    #5855
    Avatarlogikk
    Participant

    I did a 100 mile+ trip last weekend. The only thing for me is that it makes my wrists pretty sore after a while. I try to keep my weight off them as much as possible but I find it difficult. I’m 6′ with a longer torso for reference. I may try different gloves at some point to see if that helps. This is my first bike though and I am still learning so maybe I am missing something.

    #5858
    Avatarpurloined
    Participant

    In addition to my 401 Vitpilen, I have a 2000 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport. The Vitpilen has a far more comfortable riding position. As mentioned, the seat is relatively high and the bars are as well, relative to the seat. I’m 6′ 1″ and 61 years old and have found it to be comfortable, the longest stretch for me was about three hours. In 1980 I rode my Moto Guzzi LeMans on a 10,000 mile loop of the country. A long time ago, but I’d do it again and would do it on the Husqvarna but I have a bias toward that riding position. I will say that the Vitpilen shows its light weight at high speeds, but it is stable.

    #5861
    AvatarBurnzoire
    Participant

    Logikk: I’m a new rider too, and had this problem for the first couple of weeks. What fixed it is getting into the habit of resting the balls of your feet on the pegs when you don’t need to change gears or use rear brake. This dramatically helps for pushing your knees to the tank, which takes all of the weight off your wrists. It’s also good to stop accidental gear shifts, flickering tail lights, and is much safer for cornering as your feet can’t hit the tarmac. Hope this helps.

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by AvatarBurnzoire.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by AvatarBurnzoire.
    #5868
    Avatarlogikk
    Participant

    @Burnzoire Appreciate the advice. I will have to try to make that a habit.

    #5870
    AvatarDaniel Taylor
    Participant

    Great info all and thank you for the replies.

    #5871
    Avatarmaximus3k
    Participant

    Hey Daniel,

     

    I am a new rider too, I had the same issue but I guess a lot worse during the first rides at the dealer. So I paid the dealer to change the handlebars from the Svartpilen to my Vitpilen.

    After changing it, it was better but not that drastic as I expected.

    But after a few riding-tips videos on youtube I came across the habit of squeezing the grip too much, relaxed ellbows+shoulders and also the already mentioned footposition.

    After I tried to treat the grips as “unboiled eggs” it got way better and even 100 miles+ is no problem at all for me now.

    Bodyposition/relaxed riding is so much underrated when it comes to motorcycling, at least thats my experience.

    Have a good and safe ride everyone

    #5893
    AvatarDaniel Taylor
    Participant

    Great, thank you all, im going to see how it goes as my body also needs to get use to the new riding position, as as said above if you dont lean to hard or squeeze hard its ok, i also found that if you keep a straight back you can almost float over the handle bars.

     


    @maximus3k
    i am surprised to hear you say there was not a noticeable difference when you changed the bars. was it a straight swap, which parts did you use?

    #5896
    Avatarmaximus3k
    Participant

    of course the new handlebars were noticeable, But due to my bad habbits it was not the solution for my pain during riding. I could Only get rid of it by changing my body Position and habbits, which gave me a complete new and much more joyful riding experience. But that’s Just my personal Story.</p>

    With the parts I am not 100 percent sure, but it cost me 600 Euro for changing the triple clamp(painted it Black too) and handlebars, also he used the wires and levers from the svartpilen 401.

    Now my vitpilen has the “svartpilen” writing on the triple clamp, But that’s fine for me. gives it kind of a Frankenstein look haha.

    this is how it looks like now

    #5921
    AvatarDaniel Taylor
    Participant

    Thank you for your reply and i agree that yes you can find different riding position and remove weight off the wrists by keeping a straight back and not putting all your weight on the hands.

     

    any chance for a side shot.

     

    the position is getting better and my body is use to the position better and better.

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