Chain tension


Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #1318
    AvatarAnonymous

    So I noticed that my chain was a bit tight the other day. I loosened it a bit and it seemed fine. Two days later it’s tighter than it should be again. What the hell? Has anybody else had a similar issue? Thanks!

    #1320
    AvatarMacloven
    Participant

    perhaps one of your sprockets is out of round? I’ve had this with bicycles in the past. Check tension at various wheel positions to see if it changes.

    #1322
    AvatarScott Emm
    Participant

    i wouldn’t know tight from loose.  What should I look for?

    #1323
    AvatarDAP831
    Participant

    There is no reason your chain should ever get tighter. There has to be something going on with how your are measuring it etc.

    The bike should be on a stand, because changes in suspension sag cause changes in chain tension. Also as said above, you should check in a few spots. To avoid damaging your transmission you will always want to err on setting chain tension on the loose side. So if it is tighter in one spot, use that spot to make your adjustment. If you do have to make an adjustment, you need to make sure that the wheel is pulled tight in to the adjusters when you tighten the axle nut. I like to roll up a rag, place it between the chain and top of the rear sprocket and roll the wheel back wedging the rag between the chain and sprocket which pushes the wheel into the adjusters.

    #1324
    AvatarAnonymous

    I have a crappy stand but it does its job. I measure the slack in the chain following youtube tutorials, channels like Motorcyclist Magazine put out some really informative content.
    Anyway I usually leave about 3mm of slack and the chain in my Husqy had about 1mm of slack, so yeah pretty tight.
    I took her to a shop and they loosened the chain back to 3mm, giving the wheel a few thumps to make sure that it was pulled right into the adjusters as you said.
    It’s been a couple of days and she seems fine but I’ll keep a close eye on it, it’s a pretty weird thing to be happening.

    #1325
    AvatarDAP831
    Participant

    Typically, you will need to adjust your chain a bit during break-in ,but afterwards it shouldn’t be so frequent. The manual calls for a slightly different technique to measure chain slack than my other bikes. Essentially, while on the stand, in neutral, if you push up on the bottom of the chain, it should come 5-7 mm from contacting the bottom of the swingarm where the reinforcing ribs meet behind the chain slider.

    http://www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com/globalassets/manuals-pim-data/dok_bike_bed_18_3402207_en_om__sen__aepi__v1.pdf

    For some reason the 701 Manual explains it a little better than the 401 manual

    http://www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com/globalassets/manuals-pim-data/dok_bike_bed_18_3402207_en_om__sen__aepi__v1.pdf

    #1326
    AvatarAnonymous

    Huh, well I guess I better take it back to the shop and loosen it again until I get in the 5-7mm range. Also I wasn´t aware of that chain behaviour during break-in. Cheers!

    #1436
    AvatarSvartpilen410
    Participant

    @DAP831 : Thats how I interpreted the checking of the tension from what they show in the manual, but this is not how my dealer I purchased the bike from interprets it. They use 5-7mm of total play in the chain at that location on the chain (not 5-7mm clearance to the swingarm).

    To be fair, it doesn’t sound like Husqvarna has communicated much specific Vilt/Svartpilen information to the dealers yet, so its possible even the Husqvarna trained techs at my dealer aren’t correct.

    #1898
    AvatarThomas
    Participant

    I too was wondering how to interprete the instructions for chain tension measurement in the manual for my Vitpilen 701 – total play or clearence to the swingarm. Ended up checking the manual for the Duke 690 which clearly explained that it is clearence to the swingarm that should be measured. Should be the same on the Husky…

    #1909
    AvatarDAP831
    Participant

    Husqvarna is just now getting out to dealers to train them on the Vitpilens. I am using the distance to swingarm method for setting chain tension. I feel like the way your dealer is doing it results in too little chin slack. I would be worried about potentially damaging the countershaft bearings.

    #1939
    AvatarStumpkin
    Participant

    Wouldn’t the distance to swingarm method be thrown off if you changed sprocket sizes?

    #1942
    AvatarDAP831
    Participant

    Theoretically, yes. This is a bit of an unusual method for measuring chain slack.

    The whole thing about setting chain tension is that you need to provide slack to allow for changes in chain tension as the swingarm moves through it’s travel. If you were to make significant changes to the drive sprockets and want to be sure that you were safe, you would essentially need to remove the shock spring and run the swingarm through it’s full range of travel make sure that it doesn’t become too tight, typically at bottom out.

    #2088
    AvatarDAP831
    Participant

    Out of curiosity today I took a bunch of measurements on my 701, it’s not a great comparison, but maybe a good illustration. However, when I set my chain tension so that it was 5mm off the swingarm under the vertical rib, like the manual calls for the chain slack measured at the rib, ends up being almost exactly 25 mm. So if your shop is using 5-7mm of slack, there is a good chance it is way too tight

    #31498
    ScubadubbersScubadubbers
    Participant

    Where you measure the 5mm off the swingarm is important.  There is a specific spot to measure from.

    #31500
    B.I.SavageB.I.Savage
    Participant

    I had to change my first chain due to uneven wear patterns.

    Some portions of chain where outside of tolerance for length and others “tight”.

    When adjusting the chain its important to check the slack on multiple sections of chain.

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