Adjustable Suspention


This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Miquel Miquel 2 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #4032

    Weißer Pfeil
    Participant

    Has anyone messed with the suspension settings?

    I don’t really feel like i understand the adjustment completely.

    I am pretty happy with how it is set up right now but I am 225lbs so I think i ought to stiffen it up a bit.

    #4056

    DAP831
    Participant

    I have. I am about 210#, I only ride solo, and most of my riding is on very tight mountain roads that can get quite rough in spots.

    I added some preload to the rear shock spring in order to get my sag right (30mm). Doing that necessitates adding a few clicks more of rebound damping to the rear shock. I added some rebound to the forks to match the feel of rear end. From there I added a few clicks of compression to the forks to get a bit firmer feel.

    Suspension tuning is definitely an art and there is a lot of personal preference involved as well.

    #4060

    Weißer Pfeil
    Participant

    How did you do that? Im not quite sure I understand the way the adjustments work.

    #4064

    DAP831
    Participant

    There are instructions in the user manual on P 106-111.

    https://www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com/globalassets/manuals-pim-data/dok_bike_bed_18_3402211_en_om__sen__aepi__v1.pdf

    There is a preload spanner in the tool kit to adjust the preload. It fits in the notches on the spring preload collar. The collar has what looks like a ramp with some steps in it. The steps locate on an oval shaped piece on the shock body. To make your life easier spray a little lubricant on the threads of the shock. Turn the collar to the next taller step. This puts more preload on the spring, essentially stiffening it.

    The rebound adjuster for the shock is a small slotted adjustment at the very bottom of the shock where it connects to the linkage. Rebound refers to how quickly the shock will extend. More rebound damping will slow it down. Now that you have increased the springs tension, you will want to add more rebound damping. Use a flat blade screwdriver to turn it clockwise and slow down the rebound.

    The fork is adjusted by turning the knobs on the top. The red one adjusts rebound damping and , and the white one adjusts compression damping. Compression damping is the amount of resistance to compression of the fork. I don’t want to overload you with information, but all of these adjusters only effect low speed compression and rebound. This refers to the speed at which the suspension is moving up or down and not necessarily bike speed. To put that in perspective imagine you are going 10 mph and hit a 6″ speed bump that is 3′ wide. The suspension moves much more slowly than if you hit a 6″ curb at 10 mph. The suspension has a separate circuit that is not externally adjustable to deal with high shock speed bumps. The low speed adjustments you will be making effect things like brake dive, dips in the road, etc.

    hope that helped

    #4138

    Weißer Pfeil
    Participant

    Thank you very much! That was very helpful.

    #4872
    Miquel
    Miquel
    Participant

    I’m new to this onroad stuff and have zero experience, that being said, in the offroad apartment, the correct spring tension is crucial for a good riding experience.

    My svartpilen haven’t arrived yet so i don’t know what the user manual looks like, but on the offroad side (i have a ktm exc 250 2016) i’ve got a user manual telling me the rider weight, sag and clicks on the suspension, and this makes a tone of difference.

    For example, i had to change the spring rate on my EXC because my weight is 65kg without gear and the spring rate when i bought it was for 90kg fully geared.

    When your spring rate is correct you can then start to adjust the shims and clicker for the compression and rebound.

    Don’t you guys do this kind of stuff?

     

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