2019 vitpilen 401


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This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Midnaite Midnaite 5 days, 11 hours ago.

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  • #3634

    Sparrow21
    Participant

    Hey everyone,

    For a while I was undecided between the 401 or 701, but decided to go with the 401 for the spoked wheels and overall shape. I currently have the Yamaha fz 07 but I just like the looks so much of these vitpilens that I need to switch.

    I  came across this forum and started reading about people having issues with their 401. Some of these problems reminded me of my very first cheap bike the Honda cbr125. With engine cutting off randomly, kickstand issues etc. My question is are all these problems fixed or solved in the 2019 models? Are these bikes poorly made, or does the 401 version have less quality control compared to the 701?

    Thanks!

    #4015

    Cripes
    Participant

    Does anyone know of the differences/changes between the 2018 and 2019 model years?

    There are some current deals on 2018 demo models, but if they’ve improved certain things for the 2019 model year then it might be worth going for that….

    #4883
    rlarue
    rlarue
    Participant

    I don’t know what decision you two made but I bought a 2018 401 because of a huge discount and haven’t had any of the above mentioned issues yet. I’ve only been riding it for 2 weeks not though.

    #4894

    Cripes
    Participant

    Some of those 2018 model year deals are too good to miss for sure!

    I was all set to buy a lightly used 2018 model a few weeks back, but got tempted instead by a great deal on a Ducati scrambler cafe racer!

    Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer

    #4895
    Midnaite
    Midnaite
    Participant

    Some of us had issues on older models, but I guess it’s still very scarce.

    Nothing to report on mine with 6K km on the dash, bought last september.

    #4896

    logikk
    Participant

    The 2018 is manufactured in Austria and the 2019 in India. Other than that, I haven’t seen any information on there being any differences between them. I was able to get my 2018 for over $1k less than what they were trying to charge for the 2019 so that made my decision very easy. I’ve had it about 3 weeks now and put 75 miles on it. Had one odd stall at a stop sign after a long ride but that may have just been my fault. Hard to say. No issues otherwise except the chain being slightly too loose from the dealer.

    #4905
    rlarue
    rlarue
    Participant

    Nice bike, Cripes!

    #4908

    Cripes
    Participant

    Thanks!

     

    I actually had an early KTM 390 Duke for a while and found it to be quite highly strung (needed expensive valve adjustment after 300 miles from new) and cut out on roundabouts, but the latest ones seem much improved.

     

    #4914
    Kylander79
    Kylander79
    Participant

    Production is going to India (largest market for 1 cylinders bikes).  Better say “has gone to India”. Sorry, no insider, cannot tell You which production date is sourced from.

    What I believe:

    KTM acquired Husqvarna because BMW wanted to get rid off; it was fairly priced and Husqvarna (like KTM) have a good name in off-road-racing (Trial). Some synergies expected…

    Husqvarna had – without rare exemptions – never an history of street bikes. Neither has KTM – they are always assiocated with “dirt and mud”. But the SuperDukes led KTM to a new market – real street fighters…

    But a “street bike from KTM” would have been a bit “vague”; and competition is high (Japanese, Italian, German, and else).

    Building the Svartpilen and the Vitpilen was easy. All based on KTM successful models. Same mechanics, different optics – and a surcharge of 20% for the “great history” of Husqvarna…

    I would have bought a KTM 390 Duke, looking for an lightweighted, easy ride. But at the age of 58, I couldn’t stand orange wheels and “graffiti tanks”.

    I would have left KTM dealer after test-riding the Duke, because it was very convincing, but not my “style”. I told that the salesperson, and he said: ” Comeback in a fortnight, we have the same bike in a more “retro version”. And so it came I bought my Husky 401.

    Have to admit, the brand “Husqvarna” is very strong within motorbikers (like Triumph or Indian). I am proud of riding a Husky, although worldwide the name is now more narrow to movers than to bikes…

    What I didn’t get – being in marketing ever since:

    U built a great and easy to ride motorbike, with a great name and a good price tag. U built it “retro”, with wire wheels, and modern optics of a scrambler (my other option was a Ducati Scrambler, but with the height of 6.4, U cannot ride that bike). What I didn’t get – “retro bikes” are made for the elder biker generation, who dreamt or had a Kawasaki Z 650 or a Honda CB 750 Four, not to talk of an early Triumph Bonneville or even a Vincent Black Shadow…

    Aged bikers know that the weather can change – they don’t leave home without a rain jacket. But where to store? Picking that bike was easy, but making it “all-day-proof”, has been a journey of months. I hopefully made the right decisions now, but it was a way too long journey.

    KTM, excellent concept, badly executed. How many of the 200 Euros “street shoes” of the collection U sold? 1 or 2? 🙂

     

     

    #5028
    Midnaite
    Midnaite
    Participant

    I don’t agree with your view on the prepare for the rain part.

    I always have been a avid commuter rider, I have been riding scooters daily since I’m a teen. I used to store my rain wear in the trunk.

    Last year I passed my licence and bought my first real motorbike (I had a dirtbike but doesn’t count as a motorbike), and I totally change my philosophy, I bought a good waterproof all-season equipment and I’m dryer than when i was using my occasionnal rainwear. At least with my new stuff, I have extra armor.

     

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